Can you “Attract” Money? Three Things I Learned.

Why don’t you make more money?

There may be a thousand answers to that, but I just want to talk about one possibility right now.

Mindset.

In other words, what do you think about money? Are you fending it off somehow by having prejudiced feelings about it?

Could Your Feelings Affect Your Income?

If you’re a stodgy Midwesterner like me, that will sound silly. What could mindset have to do with income?

I like to keep an open mind and try to understand different points of view, so I read this book…

It made me wonder if my mindset about money was somehow lacking.

My Experiment

I decided an experiment was in order. The book hinted that perhaps I was thinking too small about money. I tend to fret about making sure there is always enough and I watch it carefully.

“Maybe,” I thought to myself, “I’m being too careful.”

With that thought in mind, I embarked upon an experiment in which I spent more money and deliberately didn’t worry about it.

I didn’t go crazy, but I did buy some things I’d been putting off, like a new sensible sub-compact car to replace my 16 year old car and an expensive skin care product I’d wanted to try.

What I Learned

I did not attract money in any mysterious way, but I did learn a few things.

One: Money is A Convenient Abstraction

Money is nothing more than an abstraction of the value of work in the marketplace. You might think that it’s the “root of all evil” or that it should “grow on trees” or that it’s attracted to certain special people, but it’s not any of those things.

It’s just an abstraction and nothing to get emotional about. If you’ve ever tried to trade labor for an object then you’ll understand what I mean. I can market your ranch in exchange for a cow, but when I bring my truck out to get the cow, we’re going to argue over whether I’m getting the young cow who is in milk or the old skinny cow.

Money makes it easier to understand what we’re agreeing to. I market your ranch for six months and you give me exactly $14,437.86. There is no confusion.

Two: Money Spent on Education is Well Spent

I notice that I spend a lot of money on education and I don’t count this the same way I count a new car. Learning something new is almost always worth the price and it’s an investment in my business.

This includes online training, classes and coaching. Anything that helps you learn more is going to help you grow your business.

Three: Scarcity is Relative

You know what? I have a lot more than a lot of other people. Sure, there are millions of people who have more than I do, but the most important thing I learned from this little experiment is that I can use what I have to help others.

If I’m not fretting about every cent then I can consider who might be in need. When the Jewish sage, Maimonides, ranked levels of charity, he said the best way ┬áis to help someone find employment or make a loan to help that person build a business.

Now I Understand

To summarize, I didn’t attract anything new, but I did learn something important.

It doesn’t matter so much if I can “attract” money. What matters is that I now understand what to do with the money I have.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *